Tag Archives for " health "

Sep 04

If You Always Fall Asleep In Your Makeup, Here’s What You Should Do The Next Morning

By Kelly Wilson

It doesn’t make much sense when I say it out loud, but taking off my makeup before bed feels like it requires more than double the amount of effort it takes to apply that morning. That being said, I’m not perfect, so even though I know better, there have been plenty of nights where I accidentally, and even purposely, neglected to take off my makeup. The (semi) good news? It happens! The bad news? It really shouldn’t.

On the surface, all you’ll see after a full night’s sleep and full face of makeup is a bit of smearing here, there, and raccoon eyes blinking back at you in the mirror. Unfortunately, though, looks can be deceiving, and what appears to be just a run of mascara, could actually be the visual signs of skin damage. Here’s what to do as soon as you wake up with a full face of makeup.

1. Remove Your Makeup

The first step is probably the most obvious here, but the first order of business after a full night’s sleep all dolled up is to strip your skin of all the cosmetic gunk hanging around from the night before. Where to start? Always at the eyes.

Dr. S Manjula Jegasothy, MD of the Miami Skin Institute told,

Many eye shadows contain quartz and mica, which are highly irritating to eyelid skin and can
concentrate in the fold, releasing dark particles into the eye for days later. This can cause
chronic irritation to the corneal surface, and cause chronic dry eye. Mascara formula can also
crumble and flake into the eye, causing these symptoms as well.

2. Wash Up

I learned about the double cleanse after some extensive research into a traditional Korean skincare routine. I may not have been able to keep up with all the many steps (especially on lazy nights), but this one stuck with me. Now that your makeup is off, wash your face with an oil-based cleanser (I love the Amorepacific Treatment Cleansing Oil Face & Eyes), applying the serum-like texture to a damp complexion, lather, and rinse, directly followed by a waterbased cleanser. The dual-action wash will ensure an optimal cleanse so no dirt or grime is left behind in on top of the skin.

3. Pamper

You enjoy being coddled and pampered when you are feeling particularly under the weather, right? Well, your skin would like to be nursed back to health with its own variation of TLC. Give compromised skin the spa treatment with a few minutes of masking. Access the damage and apply skincare accordingly, be it a sheet dripping with tightening serum, or a muddy putty powerful enough to extract impurities and dry out murky blemishes.

4. Moisturize

There is a reason you are told to drink a glass of water as soon as you wake up in the morning. After six to eight hours of beauty sleep, your skin is dehydrated AF. Add a full face of makeup to the equation, and your complexion will be reeling for relief. Liberally apply your favorite moisturizer for a burst of hydration asap. The Lano All Over Everywhere Multi-Cream is an excellent natural, super gentle balm that has been formulated with triple lanolin and milk to tenderly nurse skin back to health.

5. Change Your Bedding

Tossing and turning all night will inevitably lead to a few stains across your pillow, which a) is not cute and b) leaves traces of bacteria around to invade your next snooze. Dendy Engelmann, M.D., director of dermatologic surgery at Metropolitan Hospital told, if you don't launder your pillowcase and sheets the next day, you risk reverse contamination, so even if you end up washing your face before going to bed, that residual product will be on your pillowcase already and in effect will transfer back onto your skin when you lie down. I'm getting grossed out just thinking about it, TBH.

6. Go Natural For The Day

At this point, your skin has probably endured a full 24 hours or more of cosmetics. After you’ve taken the necessary steps to cleanse, let your skin breathe for a while. Take a day off from makeup application (you are gorgeous as is, anyway!), and restrain from picking at any blemishes or sensitive areas that may have
formed overnight.

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Jun 18

18 Simple Hacks You Can Use To Improve Your Overall Health TODAY

By Kelly Wilson

Every day we hear more and more about things we should be doing to improve our health. But with the sheer volume of studies, it’s impossible to follow it all! How’s a person to make sure they’re living a healthy life 24/7?

Here’s how. Follow these 18 simple health hacks and instantly improve your life in a very measurable way. From making sure you have an orange ready at your desk, to using a specific body scrub, each seems simple enough. But in combination, all of them will make your life soooo much better!

1. Make all your meals and snacks for the week on Sunday evening. You won’t be rushed during the week and can ensure you’re keeping a healthy diet.

 

2. For a natural mood-booster, sniff an orange.

The oil on the skin helps enhance your mood and alertness — it can also reduce anxiety.

3. Put a couple of drops of lavender oil on your pillowcase at night.

This will help you sleep straight through the night.

4. Floss your teeth.

Besides making your gums healthier, studies show it could prevent heart disease.

5. Use the 20/20/20 rule for your eyes.

Backlights on all our screens aren’t great for the eyes. Every 20 minutes, take a 20 second break and let your eyes wander over something 20 feet away.

6. Meditate every day for at least 10 minutes.

Taking some time to achieve a calmness of mind and clarity of thought comes highly recommended from Silicon Valley’s elite. Use Calm if you want some instruction.

7. Stretch a little every day. Your muscles will thank you.

8. Get off the bus or subway a stop early and walk.

Walking 30 minutes a day is shown to decrease your chance of getting cancer by 90%.

9. Drink herbal tea.

Green tea is a great energy-boosting alternative to coffee. Chamomile helps you fall asleep and fennel and peppermint teas aid digestion.

10. Put the phone down outside of work hours.

Especially within two hours of bed — the backlight can negatively affect your sleep.

 

11. Go to bed an hour early.

If you're having trouble doing this, set an alarm to remind you to get in bed.

12. Skip the expensive stuff and exfoliate your skin with a simple mixture of sea salt and olive oil.

Get the directions here.

13. Never skip the stairs.

Sneak in a little physical activity and always say no to the elevator.

14. Take your food to go and eat outside.

With even 20 minutes outdoors at lunchtime, your afternoon workday will go far better.

15. Pick days throughout the week to be alcohol free.

Especially if you're going to be drinking Thursday through Sunday, it's best to skip the wine on Monday.

16. Try to cut out sweeteners in your coffee.

Reduce your overall sugar intake with this simple trick.

17. Eat and cook at home.

Save money, not to mention the hidden salt, sugar, and fats found in to-go food.

18. Bring a bottle of water with you everywhere you go.

To help save the environment, make it a reusable steel or aluminum one, too!

(via BuzzFeed)

Together these 18 health hacks are simple enough. Now get to making your life -- and 2016 especially -- truly spectacular!

The Beauty Food Bible is changing the way folks deal with their
natural anti-aging process. Ok, it’s fantastic that more plus
more merchandise is choosing to make use of natural ingredients
in their products.

beauty of food bible

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May 21

Why Humans Lack an ‘anti-aging switch’

By Kelly Wilson

You may have seen the news that the human lifespan cannot be extended beyond about 115 years, as shown by a demographic analysis confirming that the steady improvements in lifespan seen for many populations over recent decades has stalled since the 1990s.

The researchers’ conclusion that “the maximum lifespan of humans is fixed and subject to natural constraints” is sobering reading for those who dream that human ageing can one day be successfully hacked. But for evolutionary ecologists, it should not come as a surprise.
As well as striking a note of biological realism, this research also highlights how research on human ageing often neglects the insights available from evolutionary theory — and particularly from a research field called “comparative life-history ecology”.
This genre of research explains why mice and humans grow old at such different rates (more on why this is a problem for ageing research later). It aims to bring us closer to understanding the “ultimate” reasons why we age — which in turn can tell us whether the hundreds of millions of dollars poured into ageing research are actually a good investment.
 
Strive as we might, an evolutionary perspective tells us that maximum lifespans will not be extended by simply solving one symptom of ageing after another.

Growing old — the ‘why’ as well as the ‘how’

Ageing — or “senescence”, to use the biological term — is defined as a decline in physiological condition with age. You might wonder why natural selection allows this to happen at all. The answer is that senescence happens in a “selection shadow” — that is, after organisms have already reproduced and passed on their genes. There is no real evolutionary penalty for failing to ward off the ravages of old age, because in animal populations relatively few individuals make it into their geriatric years anyway, thanks to predators, disease, hardship or bad luck.
Natural selection reaches a crescendo at sexual maturity, when most individuals in a population are alive and striving to produce viable offspring. This is the age at which the genetic baton is passed to the next generation. Unfortunately for those of us over 40, it’s all downhill from here in terms of the evolutionary pressure to maintain a healthy body.
This knowledge — that selection pressure changes with age in a way that depends not just on the expected lifespan but also on the timing of reproductive effort — is fundamental to evolutionary theories of ageing. It is also fundamental to how we design and interpret the research that aims to help us prolong our own maximum lifespans.
Many of the species most frequently studied by biologists — such as mice, flies and worms — are chosen precisely because their short lifespans and fast generational turnover make them quicker and easier to work with. But their short lives and adaptable reproductive strategies actually make them unsuitable models for testing drugs or other anti-ageing interventions aimed at slowing human ageing.
Short-lived species seem to be able to “trade in” their investment in growth and sexual reproduction in return for slowing down the ageing process — switching to a physiological state in which they instead invest in maintenance of body condition and warding off senescence.
This strategy makes sense for species whose brief lives can be subject to wide variability in environmental conditions. For a small rodent, having a litter of pups would be rather pointless if food is too scarce for them to grow and survive to adulthood. Hamsters, for example, can instead enter a torpid state that actually protects their cells from ageing over winter.
In contrast, species with long expected natural lifespans (which have reduced their mortality risk by evolving to a large size, or being able to fly or hibernate, or having a large brain) have already invested strongly, and perhaps maximally, in protecting their cells from ageing. This suggests there is no “anti-ageing switch” available to flick for a species such as ourselves. Whether or not we have children, it seems we’re already naturally geared to live as long as we possibly can.
This might sound weird, but it’s supported by a simple comparative analysis that a colleague and I published back in 2010, in which we compared the average expected lifespan with the maximum recorded lifespan for various mammals. From this we can calculate a simple ratio of average to maximum lifespan, which tells you, for a given species, how much it is theoretically possible to expand lifespan.
If we take the ratio of a short-lived species like a mouse and apply it to humans, we would predict a maximum lifespan of about 400 years! But despite all of our efforts to push the boundaries through medicine and nutrition, humans (along with elephants and other highly durable animals) don’t come close to these biblical lifespans.

See the latest news and share your comments with CNN Health on Facebook and Twitter.

So if mice find it much easier to slow down the ageing process than we do, what does that mean for anti-ageing studies using mice? Sadly, the implication is that most tactics shown to prolong lifespan in mice — such as calorie restriction — will be far less effective in humans.
If we are to break the evolutionary constraints on maximum lifespan in humans, we need to better take account of life-history ecology. This theory tells us that the causes of ageing are to be found not at the end of our lives, but at the beginning.
How our maximum lifespan is ultimately limited will be understood by research that seeks to answer why the pace of life varies so much among different animals. For me, this is the take-home message from this recent excellent research.
 

Read more: www.cnn.com

 

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